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#1 Dook

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 09:43 PM

I found a few threads on interior finishes but they were almost a decade old and didn't answer my questions. Since the paint industry and govmint regulations change constantly I started a new thread.

 

When I get ready to finish the interior, I will be looking for ways to make that overwelming task manageable. My thinking (though possibly wrong) is to tape everything off and spray the finish on with an airless sprayer. All woodwork would get one coat and then the wall logs would be sanded and recoated. I don't think a second coat on the cieling T&G or purlins would really be needed as they are far from eyesight and get no handling marks.

 

I have always used oil-based satin polyurethane without stain in past projects and liked the results. I do not intend to use any stain and don't mind the yellowing and temporary odor of the oil based finishes. I have never attempted to spray such a large area nor cielings before and my apprehension leads me to ask someone who has done this. 

The climate here is pretty dry and I don't anticipate wood "breathing" problems. I used oil-poly on the inside of my pine exterior doors of my current home 7 years ago with complete satisfaction. With temperature differentials of over 80 degrees inside to outside they have held up perfectly.

 

I know airless spraying of water based polyurethane is not uncommon but I really don't like them. I don't like the color and in my limited experience have had issues with durability and trying to sand them between coats. Still, I would go this route if it would require a whole lot less skill and effort, it just isn't my preference. It seems that water based finishes have received an undue amount of "marketing" in recent years in attempts to get people to switch over to them, so I am distrustful of them.

 

Anyone had any experience airless spraying oil based polyurethanes? What about just using tung or linseed oil instead?



#2 lisa

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 07:16 AM

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#3 GordonMcAlister

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 04:56 PM

Ahhh cr*p! Not another long post from McAlister!

 

I agree with Lisa, Sansin has IMHO the best Log Home or wood finishing products out there and I'm glad I listened to Tim's recommendations 10 years ago (otherwise I'd have "poop" for brains today...LOL...a wink, a nod, and a thank you to Tim Bullock). I originally worked with Eric Bos who is extremely knowledgeable and have since worked with Ute for all my customer service needs and follow ups (she is wonderful to work with). I do believe their products are waterborne finishes or oils suspended in a water base, as everything cleans up with just soap and water.

 

For the exterior Log finish we used Sansin's system after Power Washing the Logs. Starting with their Wood Cleaner, then their Wood Brightener, both applied with a "Back Pack" pump sprayer (like those used to spray fruit trees) with a 2 foot and 5 foot wand attachment (wearing full body/safety clothing/protection). We followed with their Boracol (insect/fungus control) but found the solution too thick to apply with either a pump sprayer or an airless sprayer, so we used 5" stain brushes to apply 2 coats. After the Boracol was fully dried into the Logs we applied Sansin's "Classic" Stain in "Natural Color" with an airless sprayer (and the back pack pump sprayer in some higher hard to reach spots) to the point of over saturation and then back brushed the stain with 5" stain brushes. Once dry we repeated the process with 2 coats of Classic Clear UV protection/stain. The final finish has been outstanding for the past 10 years. We do have a 3/4 wrap around covered deck and large roof over hangs that helps protect the Logs from weather and UV damage, but still the Winters and Sun can be brutal up on this Mountain in Vermont's snow/ski belt. Two years ago, I washed the house with Mold Armor EZ House Wash to remove the bird poop, dirt and North face mildew and the Logs looked like new again and the finish looks as good today as it did after we first applied it.

 

For the Interior Logs, we used Sansin's "Purity Clear" with 2 coats of gloss, followed by a final coat of satin. The product goes on clear but mellows to a lovely shade of amber with a glowing smooth to the touch surface that really shows off the wood grain with fabulous depth and clarity. It sands well between coats and is water proof when dry. Everyone comments on how beautiful the wood work is and I've had professional painters ask me what I used, and where they could get the product. While I've never use it, at the time I 1st ordered the Purity finish, Sansin's Artic Clear (may now be called Glacier), was as I understood it, a finish that would not yellow, but I'd recommend you check with them for all details on the product before ordering.

 

I'm not so sure I'd use an airless sprayer on the interior logs, while the Purity Clear would likely pump through the sprayer (without thinning), based upon our experience on the exterior use of an airless sprayer, I think the run-off would be a real mess on the interior, and a huge waste of finish (Sanin's products are fantastic, but they ain't cheap, but then again you get what you pay for and Sansin's products really ARE worth every penny paid). While Sansin's Purity has a really good settling property and a relatively quick dry time between coats, I would think you'd still have to back brush the logs after spraying anyway to prevent drips, air bubbles, and sags in the finish, especially on the (recommended) 2nd and 3rd coats which flows very quickly on the 1st coat of finish and are more prone to drips and sags on vertical surfaces (always finish from the floor up to prevent drip stains on lower logs). So IMHO using the sprayer seems like an extra unneeded step to get the finish on the walls and ceiling. I've used and still am using Sansin's 3 coat Purity Clear system on all the interior wood work in the Log Home (interior Lodgepole Pine Log walls, 2x8 V groove T&G Cathedral Ceilings, all 1x8 V groove T&G Wall paneling and the basement Home Theater T&G Ceiling Paneling, Loft Decking under ceilings, Log Beams, Mantle, Trusses, Purlins, Railings and Posts, Andersen Windows and Doors, Interior Doors, Built-ins and Shelving, and all Mouldings and Trim work), as well as for the interior and exterior finish of my custom (hand built) "Radiata Pine" Kitchen, Bath and Bedroom Cabinetry. I also use the Purity system to finish all my hand made Pyrographic Wildlife Log lamps, Furniture, and custom cabinetry that I build, produce and sell (what a shameless plug - see attached photos for finish).

 

Since I assume there would be some amount of back brushing after using an airless sprayer, I would just use and do use the old fashion method of applying the interior finish with foam brushes and I would eliminate the sprayer completely. We do sand everything to a final 220 grit "furniture finish" with a 5" random orbital sander (see my other posts about our sanding procedures) before applying the Sansin finish (except for the Pyrographic Lamps and Furniture that are finished by hand to 320 grit and 400 Grit finish 1st for an ultra smooth surface for hand burning the wildlife images into the wood).  And I do mean EVERYTHING including the Cathedral Ceilings, and you really want the ceilings to be finished as well as the walls and other wood work, don't believe just because of the sight distance the finish doesn't matter as much, after we did the 1st and 2nd coat on the ceilings you could see the difference and the need for a final 3rd coat. And even though we were as careful as can be applying the finish to all the wood work and ceilings, and it IS outstanding and beautiful, I can still see every minor flaw or missed drip that haunts me to this day. Before applying the finish all wood is then vacuumed dust free and washed by hand with mineral spirits and clean lint free rags, then allowed to fully dry before the 1st Gloss coat is applied with a foam brush. Once dry, we lightly sand with a 220 grit disc on a 5" random orbital sander to "chalk up" the finish for the next coat application adherence, and again vacuum and wash with mineral spirits before applying the second Gloss coat and repeat the sand-vacuum-wash process between the 2nd Gloss and 3rd/final Satin finish coat. The secret to a good high quality wood finish really is the prep work and how the smooth the wood is sanded to prior to finishing, as well as the quality of the finishing material/product, and I can't recommend Sansin enough. I've used oil based, water based, gel based, Poly and Spar finishes in the past on all kinds of wood work and wood species from Miniwax, Baer, and countless other brands, as well as  

varnish, tung, and linseed oils (even with their fire hazards) over the past 43 plus years of furniture and stick house building, by far I've found Sansin's products to be the easiest to use and the best quality finish to date (and NO I don't work for Sansin, I'm just a satisfied customer who's avoided a bad case of "poop brains")

 

Finally, and yes this is really over kill and you may not find this step necessary, but because I have "NO LIFE", so you can just call me "Al Bundy", since I'm "Married with Children"...LOL, I hand apply a coat of Butcher's Bowling Alley Wax (available from the BWCCompany.com) to all the wood work and either hand buff or machine buff (depending on the surface size) once dry, for a final finish which makes cleaning the wood work in the future a breeze as well as giving a lovely hard protective final finish to the wood (My Lamps and Furniture pieces get a final hand buffed application of Sprayed on Beeswax after the Bowling Alley wax, just before shipping just to kick them up a notch in depth and beauty).

 

Yes, the sanding and finishing process is labor intensive, and at times you may feel it's an "overwhelming task", (You want to talk "Overwhelming"? Consider this, we have 3 floors of 10 foot high Log and interior paneled wood walls with Cathedral Ceilings in the Great room and Loft/Bedrooms with an approximate 4500+ Square foot interior footprint that was/is being finished, if you do the math for all vertical, pitched and horizontal wood surfaces, full round 10 and 12 inch exposed Log Beams, Posts, Purlins, Main Log Truss, Doors Windows Log Railings, Trim and Cabinets, you can see that's a whole lot of finish material with 3 coats applied, never mind the sanding labor of finishing with 8 grits of 7" and 5" sanding discs from 50 grit to 220 Grit) but as with anything beautiful (including my wife...I hope that makes up for the Al Bundy crack..LOL) you need to give it your tender loving care if you want perfection!

 

I hope this helps you in some small way on your choice of finishing method and product, and if not, screw it who wants pie? Good luck with your project and If you have any questions or want to see some Sansin interior finish photos of "Otter's Run" feel free to contact me.

 

Best Regards and a Happy and Healthy New Year to everyone at LHotI

Gordon

Attached Thumbnails

  • 40 The Fisherman pyrographic log floor lamp close up.JPG
  • 38 Pyrographic Floor Lamp.JPG

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#4 Greg Steckler

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Posted 06 January 2015 - 02:24 PM

Well, Gordon, I think that is going to be the definitive post on finishes...of any kind.  Thank YOU!


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#5 Dook

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Posted 06 January 2015 - 03:20 PM

Thanks for the detailed reply, Gordon.

 

Having painted several cars and trucks in the past, I appreciate the amount of work that goes into preparation. On glossy automotive finishes, we usually went down to 320 grit, but 220 was plenty for work trucks. It seems 220 on satin varnished wood would be overkill on anything except furniture. I've gotten good results with 120 on kitchen cabinets using 2 coats of oil based polyurethane. Satin hides a lot of sins. Maybe my eyesight isn't as good as yours or my standards are lower. 

My limited experience sanding water borne polyurethane was that it was not sandable at all, it was like trying to sand latex paint, just balls up and clogs the paper, no dust. That project had been varnished 20 years ago so am I to assume that they have solved that problem with water borne polyurethanes?

My main motivation for using airless is the thought of brushing T&G cielings overhead. Unless the finish is an almost gel consistency, brushing would seem more like taking a shower in varnish.

Around here log contractors are usually doing roofs built up on 2x6 T&G, then framing and foaming over top of that. Usually that means the T&G goes on unvarnished in a hurry to get it dried in. If I decide to stick frame the roof with 2x12's and put fiberglass in afterwards, it would be no problem to varnish all the T&G on sawhorses beforehand, than brad it on later. The penetration would be better and it would be much easier to sand between coats.

Speaking of penetration, is it not true that oil based polyurethane penetrates better than water borne?



#6 GordonMcAlister

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Posted 06 January 2015 - 10:23 PM

Thanks Greg for the kind (if not ironic) comments, I guess if I had a real life I'd write shorter posts...LOL! (You do realize I write to entertain myself, more then anything else, after all I'm just another Bozo on this Log Home bus!)

 

Dook, I hear ya on painting cars, I've done some painting and body work over the years on a Dodge Caravan, a Ford Escort, an Austin Healey 3000, a MG Midget, a Triumph TR250 and a BMW Z3, I was selling and I'll admit, since I was selling them I may not have put as much tender loving care into the paint jobs as I should have. Back in the 90s I did some work on my 1977 MGB, a complete rebuild from the ground up. When the last MGB rolled off the production line in 1980 I rolled my '77 into the garage and didn't touch it again until '95. In the 2 year re-build I repaired some small dings and dents and with the painting I remember going all the way to 600 grit wet sanding between paint coats and using 3M's "Finesse-it II" 1500 grit cutting paste to get the final mirror like finish. The "B" still sits under cover in the Garage with only 18,500 original miles, QQQ plates, and is in showroom/car show condition (we've won a few minor awards over the years), it does occasionally get out on the road just to blow the cob-webs out, but the "Classic Car" QQQ plates restrict daily driving activities. It's the only vehicle I've ever bought "new from the dealer" that went up in value, paying less then $6000.00 new (fully loaded, or as loaded as an MGB could be at the time) in '77, and as of the last appraisal in 2001 was valued over $10,000.00. My kids all argue who will get it when I go to meet my maker, and my daughter wants it left for my 3 Grandkids, but I fully intend to be buried in that car as my last laugh at them all.(See Tux Studs attached :) )

 

But I digress from the topic at hand, IMHO auto painting, or painting on any metals for that matter, especially with Acrylic paint (such as that used on the MGB) or lacquers is a whole other beasty compared to staining or finishing a wood working project, and the way I see it building a Log Home is after all, just a GIANT wood working project. I'm not so sure my standards are any higher then the next guy, and without my trifocals I'm as blind as a mole in coal (it really sucks getting old), but I will admit I am anal about everything and a bit compulsive when it comes to the care I've put into building this Log Home (THAT'S WHY IT HAS TAKEN 13 FRICKEN YEARS TO GET TO THIS POINT! PLEASE JUST SHOOT ME NOW!!!!)

 

I can't speak for all water borne polys but the few I've used didn't give me much trouble sanding between coats, I've never really had the balling up experience you speak of, unless you sand too aggressively and generate some heat between the paper and the finish, which will gum up the sand paper even on oil based polys. I've had that problem when trying to remove 3 coats of finish to get back to bare wood on occasion. Maybe it's my always using 220 grit or higher and lightly sanding between coats that has prevented the problem. As I mentioned I just run the orbital sander lightly on the finish after it's dry (I find the Sansin's minimum dry time before sanding is about 6 hours depending on relative humidity and room temperature. 60 to 70 degrees and fairly dry air is optimum), sand just enough to "Chalk" it up and remove/smooth out an occasional flaw/drip/sag in the previous coat, then I remove the dust and mineral spirit wash, and when dry the finish is dulled down enough to give the next coat something to bite to.

 

I used a 2 part water based poly floor finish (sealer and finish) on the Southern Pine stair treads in the Log home, as I felt it would be more scratch resistant then the Sansin Clear I used on the walls and ceiling (it isn't, but then again it's hard to prevent wood floor and stair scratches from happening when three 90 Lb. Labs are running around the house, chasing the grandkids), and I've used a water based poly to stain and finish all the Oak wood work, mouldings and Interior doors in our NJ stick built home. In both situations I never had any problems sanding between coats. Over the years I've always used oil based poly clear finishes on the Oak furniture I've built (tables, cabinets, book cases etc.) as I like the Natural Golden warmth it gives to Red Oak, but I have found that some oil based polys can sometimes be frustrating with settling out evenly, and have even experienced orange peal and pin bubbles from time to time over different base stains.

 

I now use "Norton 3X" 5" sanding disc exclusively (I've tried and used many brands, Porter Cable, Diablo, Gator, Mirka, etc., but find Norton 3X to be the best and longest lasting) and I use a gum rubber matt roto-spin "Sander Sitter" cleaner when resting the running sander (keeps the discs clean and lasting longer-available at Rockler and other wood working supply companies). I use the same method whether I use oil based Poly and Spars or water based Polys. I just re-finished our outdoor Cedar Skirt Spa/Hot Tub and the matching cabinets and deck furniture over the past 2 summers. Completely chemically stripping off the old finish, sanding the wood to 220 grit and applying 3 coats of oil based clear Semi-Gloss Spar finish with great results. Honestly, while I do change out the discs frequently (once I find the paper is getting dull to the touch) I don't find that the sanding discs condition (balling up, clogging, or excessive wear) shows any difference between the different base types of polys, and the 220 grit discs seem to last as long as they do when sanding bare wood (well depending on the wood of course Pines and Cedar will not dull down the paper as fast as Oak and Maple will).

 

But with all that said I've never had any problems of any kind using the Sansin products, the stuff IMHO really is that good. As far as penetration into the wood, since I'm using a Sansin clear finish and not a colored stain on the interior I find it soaks into the wood about as much as the oil based clear finishes soak into the wood (i.e. the Sansin is just as much a b1tc# to sand down to the raw wood as an oil based poly is).

 

Regarding the 2x8 T&G roof, as well as the main floor ceilings (which are the bottom of the T&G loft decking) they were all installed prior to being finished, using the same quick "dried-in" method you speak of. You can see the construction of the roof system (as well as the logs and decking) at our web site in the "Exterior" section  ( www.ottersrun.com , the site hasn't been updated in a while, since I've started the finish work on the Log home, but the dried in stages are pretty much all there). The 2x8 T&G roof was laid over the Log Purlin/Truss frame work and 2x12 Rafters were Laid over the T&G ceiling and then sprayed with 7 inches of closed cell foam insulation for an R42+ value, then Sheathed in OSB board, covered with Ice and Water Dam membrane top to bottom, and finished with a Teflon coated Standing Seam Steel roof (vented from the eves to the ridge core vent).

 

Problem was;

1) the "dried-in" wasn't quick, I had contractor crew problems and went a month without a waterproof roof and 6 Giant holes where the Skylights were to be installed (long story for another time and place, as if this post isn't long enough already, but I'm not bitter as the contractor eventually "bit a bullet" by his own hand, and now sits comfortably beside Satan basking in the warm glow of H3LL! Are you having fun yet Joe?). Tarps were useless and the rain water just poured into the shell to the point of passing all the way down to the basement/foundation and we had an indoor pool down there for a while.

 

And;

2) it wasn't very dry! The year we built it rained non-stop from May to August, worst rain season in our area in years (that is until Irene hit and wiped out the state). In the Vermont Snow Belt, they say we have only 3 seasons; Winter Season, Mud Season, and Construction Season (Ok there's a 4th season if you consider "Black Fly" Season, dang those little buggers hurt, but that's from Mother's Day to Father's Day so it kind of falls during Mud season, all the non-flatlanders will know what I mean). The rains were so bad during that year's "Construction" season that I had to rebuild my 1034 foot mountain road twice to repair the damage from mountain run-off and construction truck traffic (we almost lost the Tractor-trailer hauling the Superior walls foundation up the mud sliding road) . Even though our home is named after our dear departed Chocolate Lab, my excavators joked that I picked the right name "Otter's Run" because you needed to be a Otter to work in that much rain water. As such the interior Ceilings, decking and Logs were hammered by the weather and took a ton of water damage that has taken years of sanding to repair.

 

So, YES it was a major pain in the butt, and the BENT BACK NECK to sand all that ceiling wood on ladders and scaffolding, using an 18 Lb. 7" Makita Vari-Speed Sander, followed by a 5" Porter Cable Random Orbital Sander (we've burnt out 5 of these so far), and a Fein Multi-Tool detail sander, to go from 50 Grit to 220 grit, to get to the point of applying the 3 coats of finish. See I told you I was anal! LOL. However, I will say the Sansin Purity finish is thick enough (like a heavy cream or latex paint) that it flows on and adheres rather quick and dries fairly fast during application (as with any poly finish, be careful back brushing over semi dried applied finish to prevent streaking and gumming) that we never experienced any sort of "shower" exposure. Yeah, we'd get drips coming off the foam brushes if you didn't wipe the excess off well enough on the stain buckets, or if you got sloppy and careless you'd get some material on you, and of course there was the occasional scream, "HEADS UP-WATCH OUT BELOW", as a half filled stain bucket or saturated brush took a nose dive of the ladder, which was usually followed by a whole lot of curse words from above and below! But in reality using the Sansin product was no different or more drippy then painting a ceiling with latex paint and a hand brush, as one would do along the edges and corners of a sheet rocked ceiling when using paint rollers, just a whole lot more surface to hand paint (oh, and as an FYI, foam rollers don't work well applying the Sansin product, I have a whole case of unused rollers that attests to that),  And as I said clean up was with soap and water, which was a whole lot more pleasant then cleaning up oil based polys, spars and varnishes.

 

As far as finishing on saw horses, yeah that's a whole lot more comfortable and maybe a bit cleaner. We do that with all the mouldings, railings, and trim work (both sides to seal the wood) before installing it. We also sanded all the interior T&G wood paneling on saw horses before installing it, but finished it vertically after it was installed. Being Scottish (i.e. CHEAP) I'd rather put in the sweat labor to stain/finish the ceiling then pay for all that wood to cover over an existing ceiling. I'd rather use the money to furnish a room, or invest in more A/V equipment, or home automation stuff for the house. Let's see, a few $1000.00 for T&G paneling to cover the ceiling, or a few months work and another 3D Hi-Def Smart TV for a bedroom...sorry dude, I gotta go with the TV! - I do like my toys, as they say "Little boys never grow up, their toys just get more expensive!", and after all isn't it true that the one who dies with the most toys wins? ...LOL ...Then again, as my brother is so fond of saying; "The more stuff you own, the more it owns you!").

 

Anyway you decide to go, it's still going to be labor intensive working on those ceilings (unless you hire it out, and forgo that new TV). The way I see it, I always looked at the work as being therapy and quality time spent alone wandering around the cob-web covered caverns of my mind (creeeaaak.... sorry this section's closed, and was burnt out at one too many Pink Floyd concerts....), but then again, I know I'm just a pair of big floppy red shoes and a squeaky red nose away from being "Full Tilt Bozo"!  Does the Bus stop here?

 

Good luck and let us know how your project turns out!

 

Regards

Gordon

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The path I tread is narrow, and the drop is sheer and very high.
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#7 Dook

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Posted 06 January 2015 - 11:45 PM

Thanks, Gordon. You wear me out just thinking of all that work, LOL! I want to have mine finished in a year and a half with the exception of minor touches after settling. We only get 14 inches of precipitation a year so hopefully I won't have as many water related troubles. Note to self: Do not install skylights.

 

Sanding tips duly noted.  The sanding issues I referred to are easily noticed by trying to sand it for 3 seconds. As a matter of fact that is how one tests whether a previous paint job was latex or alkyd/oil if you can't tell by looking at it. 

 

Forgive my scepticism about water borne polyurethane, maybe my bad experiences are unique. In my current home, I had a contractor custom build some knotty pine kitchen cabinets. I told him I wanted oil based polyurethane and he said OK. When he was done I realized it was water based and he said," oh yeah, the smell of that oil based stuff really gets me sick so I used water based instead".  Although his cabinet work was nice, the finish looks poor. The water based stuff raised the grain (which oil based doesn't do) and instead of bringing out the rich contrast in the grain of knotty pine, obscured it and made it look more like spruce. Maybe the raised grain issue is why water based requires so much sanding between coats.

When I do oil based, I don't even sand beforehand unless there are watermarks, pencil marks and the like. I just slather on sanding sealer or regular oil based polyurethane. When it dries, all the surface fuzz becomes solidified and encapsulated and makes a rough finish then after sanding it off, air blowing and wiping with a damp cloth it's ready for satin topcoat which I apply with a quality bristle brush. Good enough for me and it's very water and stain resistant. I have never had any problems of any kind with interior oil based polyurethane and have been doing all my projects with it since 1983.

Getting me to switch to water based will be like pulling teeth unless it's a whole lot less labor intensive which it doesn't seem to be.



#8 GordonMcAlister

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Posted 07 January 2015 - 02:00 AM

Dook, You wrote: "You wear me out"

 

You're worn out, just look at these big red shoes, I've only had them a few days and already they have holes in them! LOL...

 

Finished in a year and a half, good plan, I salute you and sincerely wish you well. Really I do, I'm not trying to be a smarta$$, and I hope your journey to your Log home dream is as smooth and joyful as can be!!!

 

Plans, yeah I remember plans ;), as they say; "The best laid plans of men and mice", we figured we be complete in 3 to 5 years max at the start of our Log Home, and the local building department only issues their permits on a 2 year basis. We started the project as a family all working hard at the task, Wife, 3 kids, and a future son-in-law, all gun-ho and ready to go. Funny thing happened right after we finished staining the exterior, my motley crew disappeared. 1 son in College, 1 son in the Marines, and now both living back home, working full time these days for a local ski shop, the Marine is going back to finish college this year and the College Grad is awaiting his acceptance into the local police department. My Daughter got married and started popping out kids like an "Easy Bake Oven", the wife became Grammy and stayed home to take care of the Grandkids while my Daughter and Son-in-Law worked. And I Papa, found myself, working my NJ business Monday thru Friday and traveling the 215 miles and 4 hours each way to Vermont to build the house by myself on the weekends. I had not a single grey hair on my head at the start, and now I could play Santa at the local mall. I could spring from my bed early each morning without an ache or a pain to slow me down, but these days I feel like a Pink Floyd song, my swollen hands feel like two balloons, and I've become "Comfortably Numb"! To paraphrase Indiana Jones, "It's not the years, that's taken the toll on my body, it's the mileage!". With Gas prices what they've been these past few years, and 6 permits later, I've altered my travel and construction times to 2 to 3 weeks in Vermont building, and 2 to 3 weeks back home in NJ with the family and work our businesses via the net, from each location. The whole family still comes to Vermont every holiday and vacation, but these days they all just want to be on holiday or vacation, and Papa is still the only one building the FRICKEN house. I will say we're 95% complete at this point, but my experience in building is that every single step or project that I thought would only take X amount of hours has taken 2 and 3 times as long. Yeah we had some problems with the shell construction and dry-in that required correcting mistakes sub-contractors made, and the house has evolved well beyond it's original blue print plans, particularly the Home Automation systems, the Whole House Audio/Video/Data and Home Theater systems, the Hybrid Radiant heating/cooling systems and the Electronics/Electric systems, as we keep revising and updating the Smart home features as new technology becomes available, and yes, I've put extreme efforts into crafting the woodwork and cabinetry, as well as all the stone work, flooring, tile work, and plumbing, so I can't complain that much, and I really do enjoy the work and the satisfaction of hearing visitors comment in awe about the quality of the work. But, yeah, plans, I do remember them!

 

All kidding aside for the most part our Log Home journey has been an enjoyable one, and I really don't have any regrets. Would I do it again? ABSOLUTELY! But as I said I'm fairly close to being full tilt BOZO! (Click the link to read the 1st PDF chapters of our story on the 1st inside page of our web site, and the stuff we went through just to get our bridge built, and you'll understand my spiral into madness! :o...LOL)

 

As I'm coming to the end of this journey, I can really see the light at the end of the tunnel (I'm just hoping it's not a MAC truck driving the wrong way!) I'm hoping 1 more year should do it (maybe two) to be complete with a few small things to finish up. Then I can make "plans" to repair and fix all the stuff that needs attention back in NJ, once I'm done there, I plan on starting on the repairs and maintenance back up in VT. As my Dad's old neighbor told me back in 1979 when we started construction on the NJ house, "when you think you've finally finished your house, it's time to start all over again!". Oh and these days my daughter has a long list of projects I need to do on her home, I'm just now finishing up their 11.2 THX home theater and cabinet installation, having completed their laundry room early last year, and she's starting to talk about raising the roof for a master bedroom and a walk out deck on the back of her split level. Plans! Yeah, I remember them, as I said; PLEASE JUST SHOOT ME NOW! :)

 

 

 

Dook, I fully understand you feelings on the staining/finishing, one must do what one feels comfortable doing, and it sounds like you know what you're doing. I'd only suggest that you check out the Sansin web site and their products. Perhaps an email or phone call to Sansin might be worth while to address your concerns, maybe they could send you some samples to test at your convenience. As Lisa said, it was one of the best 5 decisions she made on her home, and as Tim Bullock, whose a member of LHotI and an exceptional professional Log Home builder, said to me 10 years ago, "Anyone who doesn't use Sansin on their Log Home has Poop for Brains", well maybe not that exact word, but I don't feel comfortable typing it on the open forum, but you get the point. I can only say I'm real happy I listened to his advice.

 

Be well and regards

Gordon


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The path I tread is narrow, and the drop is sheer and very high.
The Ravens all are closing in, under covers here I hide.
Please wake me! (PF)

 

www.ottersrun.com





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