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Osborn Brushes


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#1 April Showers

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Posted 25 February 2003 - 03:40 PM

Mike, based on your advice, we have ordered one of these to clean up the logs on our house. Any advice on actually using it? We have milled white pine logs.

Ha! I got to start the first thread!
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#2 Joseph Murray

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Posted 25 February 2003 - 05:00 PM

I will be finishing my logs mid summer(I hope)
Please let us know your results. Joe Murray

#3 Stephanie

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Posted 25 February 2003 - 09:33 PM

You know, I did not realize you posted a similar query to mine! What are you using on the logs: the Osborn brushes, elbow grease, and ... ?

#4 Dave Meers

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Posted 26 February 2003 - 04:39 PM

April,
I too am looking for a good process to sand my interior log walls, ridge beams, and support columns. What grit Osborne brush did you order and is it the round or square bristle? This sure sounds like a better solution than an orbital sander.

Mike,
Any further info on this equipment and process would be greatly appreciated.

#5 April Showers

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Posted 26 February 2003 - 04:59 PM

I used the link Mike proviced to Schroeder's Log Home Supply. I called them, and they were most helpful. I got the 4" brush, and I believe they said it was 80 grit. It should come by the weekend. Will let you know how it works. Actually we have flat logs, and my husband carefully used his belt sander on the flat part of the logs. The corners and the crevices and the little grooves between the logs are what we were finding hard to reach.
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#6 MikeS

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Posted 27 February 2003 - 03:03 AM

Dave

We use a Milwaukee 7" angle grinder, with variable speed. Set the RPM low. We use the larger brush. They all are the same grit.

You can also use an electric car buffer, which is low RPM. Make sure you get the 3/4" arbor, as a I BELIEVE the brush nut is that diameter.

You need to keep moving, and not stay in the same spot long. It will burn the wood. We use safeway scaffold on wheels, staging planks, and create mobile and easy access. Working off ladders is a PIA and dangerous.

I use the brush primarily in conjunction with chemical preparation, using Prep from Perma Chink. This combination is by far the fastest and least costly (read pay for the labor) of any method. Must be done prior to installing finish ceiling, wall materials, and windows (unless you cover them).

My painters are stuck with customers who do not hire us to do the prep per above, or who choose to do the work themselves and discover the amount of work involved, or do not do the preparation at the proper sequence in the construction time line. My painters will use either the brush or 3-M pads, and do it dry with no chemicals in these situations. It takes a lot longer, and the final results is not as good as chemical and buffing. It's about the only alternative available. Obviously, my painters prefer to do it with chemicals, which is less costly for the home owner.

All this work is focused on retaining the hand peeled look, and freshening up the wood to remove the "sun tan" that it gets. It does not focus on removing or reducing the effects of poorly cared for logs, and the resulting blue stain or black that forms. Some of these sap stains are impossible to remove, and only can be reduced. Chemicals like Prep are necessary to reduce the effects.

I don't like bleach, although it does work. It is hard on the wood, requires a LOT of water to rinse off completely, and also can cause the finish to adhere poorly. Some professional painters will not apply or will not warrant finishes applied over bleached wood.
Mike Senty - Senty Handcrafted Log Homes - www.senty.com

#7 Dave Meers

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Posted 27 February 2003 - 03:24 AM

Mike,
Thanks for the additional details on using the abrasive brushes. My logs are 10 inch WRC Swedish Cope and I am only trying to freshen them up before applying a clear finish. I guess I'll try the 80 grit brush to start. If it leaves too many swirl marks, I'll switch to the 120 grit. I'm not planning to use a chemical cleaner at this point. It still sounds better than using an orbital sander.............:)

#8 Jim Bilyeu

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Posted 27 February 2003 - 04:31 AM

Mike,

Just though you might like to know that the osborn brush comes in different grits. The most common is the 60 grit (course) and 80 grit (fine). The brushes we have, simular to the osborn brush comes in 45 grit (course) and 80 grit (fine).

The main thing about using these brushes is to let the brush do the work. You don't have to use a lot of preasure.
...Jim Bilyeu...
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#9 Dave Meers

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Posted 28 February 2003 - 10:38 PM

If anyone is planning to buy some Osborn brushes, MSCDirect.com has the best prices and delivery I have found - $46 for 6 inch diameter and they come in 80 and 120 grit.

#10 Tim Bullock

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Posted 28 February 2003 - 11:10 PM

Mike......We use the stickit pads from 3M.......use and replace easily.........not for logs.........other stuff!!!!!!!

#11 Paula-in-CO

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Posted 04 March 2003 - 10:35 PM

As someone else mentioned, these things come in 120 and even 320 grit! That is great news for those of us with hand hewn finishes. I am in the process of ordering one at 120 grit. I'll let you know how I like it.




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